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RAGUSA MINERALS

Why Halloysite?

Why do we need halloysite?


(Dummy Text) Halloysite’s tubular microstructure – naturally occurring hollow nanotubes that are imperceptible to the human eye — make halloysite a unique mineral with highly desirable properties. 

Features such as a high surface area to unit weight ratio, high porosity and differential charge capabilities between inner and outer surfaces have led researchers to discover its suitability in high-tech processes and end-uses such as carbon capture and conversion, hydrogen storage, water remediation and nanotechnology.
 

What's it made from?

(Dummy Text) Halloysite is an aluminosilicate clay mineral with the empirical formula Al2Si2O5(OH)4. Its main constituents are oxygen (55.78%), silicon (21.76%), aluminium (20.90%), and hydrogen (1.56%). Halloysite typically forms by hydrothermal alteration of alumino-silicate minerals.[4] It can occur intermixed with dickite, kaolinite, montmorillonite and other clay minerals. X-ray diffraction studies are required for positive identification. It was first described in 1826 and named after the Belgian geologist Omalius d'Halloy.

What's it worth?

(Dummy Text) What should get potential investors excited is that halloysite and hybrid halloysite-kaolin is far more valuable than regular kaolin, as well as the scarcity of large, commercial deposits of halloysite nanotubes.

Pure halloysite sells for up to US$5,000/tonne, compared to a kaolin/halloysite hybrid, which fetches between A$500 and A$1,000/tonne, and pure kaolin going for A$300/tonne.

Is it easy to get out of the ground?
 

(Dummy Text) What should get potential investors excited is that halloysite and hybrid halloysite-kaolin is far more valuable than regular kaolin, as well as the scarcity of large, commercial deposits of halloysite nanotubes.

Pure halloysite sells for up to US$5,000/tonne, compared to a kaolin/halloysite hybrid, which fetches between A$500 and A$1,000/tonne, and pure kaolin going for A$300/tonne.